Burren National Park – Seven Walking Trails

Burren National Park – Seven Walking Trails

Trailhead: The Burren National Park is situated on the south-eastern side of the Burren, in north Co. Clare. To access the park, from Corofin, take the R476 to Kilnaboy. In Kilnaboy, take the right turn (L1112) before the ruined church. Approximately 5 kilometres along this road you will reach a crossroads. There is a lay-by just before this crossroads on the right. Then on foot, turn right, along the ‘Crag road’, Burren National Park lands are on your left. Please park in the lay-by not on the crag road to avoid damage to the vegetation. This is a public road so be careful of traffic.

There is no charge to park in the lay-by or to enter the Burren National Park.

Seven Walking Trails
There are seven way-marked walking trails in the Burren National Park and Slieve Carran Nature Reserve. The walks vary from a short thirty-minute loop walk to a three-hour walk over limestone hills. Details of each of the walks are outlined below and a Walking Trails Map is available for download (JPEG 1.64MB) Each trail is signposted with colour-coded markers. The trails traverse a limestone landscape which can be uneven and steep in places, so care must be taken. Please be aware that none of these trails are wheelchair accessible. For trail advice, you can contact us at the Burren National Park Information Point from April to September.

Guided Walks
During the season, we offer free guided walks along the trails throughout the National Park covering topics such as Burren flora, fauna and geology. Guided walks can also be arranged for interested groups (for 4 people and more). Please contact us for more information. All of our walks are entirely free but BOOKING IS REQUIRED as places are limited.

All non-National Parks and Wildlife Service staff wishing to provide a guided walk in the Burren National Park must APPLY FOR A PERMIT from the Park Ranger.

Distance


Address

The Burren National Park, County Clare


One of Ireland’s most famous sights, the Cliffs of Moher are entirely vertical and the cliff edge is abrupt. On a clear day the views are tremendous, with the Aran Islands etched on the waters of Galway Bay. From the cliff edge you can just hear the booming far below as the waves crash and gnaw at the soft shale and sandstone.

With a due-west exposure, sunset is the best time to visit.

Lonely Planet
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