Up Close and Personal

There’s no better way to experience nature up close and personal than by a trip to the Cliffs of Moher: 8 kilometres of sheer rock face shaped by time that is home to a wealth of birds, flowers, marine life and sea and land mammals – making the Cliffs an experience of diversity in action.

Bird Life

Puffin populations at the Cliffs of Moher are increasing in contrast with declining numbers at many other European colonies

Puffins

While Atlantic Puffin populations are dwindling throughout Europe, the numbers at the Cliff’s are increasing. The Cliffs of Moher puffin is a member of the Auk family which winters at sea and returns to shore for the nesting season from late May to mid July. The best time for you to view them is between May and June.

It’s not surprising that the Cliffs of Moher boasts one of the major colonies of cliff nesting seabirds in Ireland – offering you a viewing of over 20 different species. The area was designated a Special Protection Area (SPA) for Birds under the EU Birds Directive – with internationally important numbers of guillemot and razorbill and also significant numbers of puffin, kittiwake and fulmar.

From late February, a variety of seabirds like guillemot, razorbill, great black backed gulls and shag begin to return to the Cliffs from their wintering grounds – while the Atlantic puffin arrives around the end of March. You may also be lucky enough to see endangered bird species like choughs and peregrine falcons.

Tip

Bring a pair of binoculars with you when you visit, to help with your viewing. Enjoy!

Flora

You’ll see that the plants growing on and around the Cliffs of Moher are tough and hardy to survive the prevailing winds and thin soils. On the rocks and shore you’ll see seaweed and lichens, while mosses and liverworts cling to the cliff face along with wild flowers and grasses such as scurvy grass, sheep’s bit, sea pink and sea campion.

Nature’s wonders surround you at the Cliffs of Moher

One of Ireland’s most famous sights, the Cliffs of Moher are entirely vertical and the cliff edge is abrupt. On a clear day the views are tremendous, with the Aran Islands etched on the waters of Galway Bay. From the cliff edge you can just hear the booming far below as the waves crash and gnaw at the soft shale and sandstone.

With a due-west exposure, sunset is the best time to visit.

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12th December 2017

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Coastal walk closed 30th November to 15th December for remedial works

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